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Car Keeps Dying Battery And Alternator Are Good? 9 Ways Fix

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Are you one of those car owners with a dying battery? You may be wondering what causes these problems. After all, no driver wishes to wake up to a dead car battery.

Some of these issues may be due to a number of factors, such as lack of use, extreme temperatures or humidity, electrical issues, or faulty or corroded terminals.

Your car keeps dying battery and alternator are good; keep reading to find out the common reasons why. The last thing you want to do is ignore the problem, since it could cause further damage to other parts of the car.

Why Do Car Batteries Die?

Car electrician performing a multimeter battery inspection

Remember that car batteries can die for various reasons, such as age, lack of maintenance, and exposure to extreme temperatures.

Over time, the chemicals inside the battery break down, reducing its ability to hold a charge. Leaving lights or other electrical devices on for an extended period can drain the car’s battery.

Exposure to high temperatures can cause the battery fluid to evaporate, reducing its effectiveness. Cold temperatures can also reduce the battery’s ability to hold a charge.

Not keeping the car’s battery charged and maintained can also lead to a shorter lifespan.

Top 8 Reasons Why Your Car Battery Keep Dying

Here are some of the top reasons your car battery keeps dying:

#1. Age

Car batteries have a limited lifespan and will eventually wear out. Remember that as the battery ages, its ability to hold a charge decreases, and it may need to be replaced.

#2. Faulty alternator

A malfunctioning alternator can prevent the battery from recharging while the car is running, leading to a bad battery. A battery connected to a bad alternator will eventually drain, leaving the vehicle without power and unable to start.

#3. Corroded battery connections and terminals

Corrosion on the terminals can prevent the battery from receiving a charge.

#4. Temperature or weather issues

Exposure to extreme hot or cold temperatures can reduce the battery’s effectiveness and shorten its battery life. Using a battery that is not designed for the region or weather conditions you are in can also cause the battery to die faster.

#5. Electrical drain or parasitic draw

Leaving lights or other electrical devices on for an extended period can drain the battery. The parasitic draw happens when most batteries continue to draw power even when the vehicle is not running and can quickly drain a battery.

#6. Loose battery connections

A loose battery cable or dirty posts can prevent it from receiving a charge. Look for bad ground cable connections, possible issues within the fuse box, or maybe one fuse is currently blown.

#7. Lack of use

If a car is not driven frequently, the battery may not receive enough charge to maintain its power. Eventually, you are going to have to replace the existing battery if you let the automobile sit without use for a long time.

#8. Non-compliance

A non-compliant battery for a specific vehicle can cause the battery to die faster. If your battery dies as soon as you have purchased it or soon thereafter, it is likely due to non-compliance.

It’s important to keep an eye on your battery’s health and address any issues as soon as possible to prevent it from dying. Regular maintenance and inspections can help extend the life of your battery.

How Can You Diagnose the Problem of Your Dead Car Battery?

The easiest way to find out how to solve this problem is to figure out if your alternator is working or not.

You can test this by disconnecting the positive cable of your battery while the engine runs. If the engine shuts down, that means that your alternator needs to be replaced.

However, if your battery keeps dying, there could be several potential causes. Here are some steps you can take to diagnose the problem:

#1 Age of the battery

If the battery is more than three years old, it may be nearing the end of its lifespan and may need to be replaced.

#2 Electrical battery drain or parasitic draw

Ensure all lights and electrical devices are turned off when the car is not in use. A parasitic draw can also drain the battery, such as a faulty component or aftermarket device.

You can perform a parasitic draw test to find out by connecting the lead of your multimeter to the negative battery post and connecting the other lead to the black cable.

#3 Verify you have a good alternator and its working correctly

A malfunctioning alternator can prevent the battery from recharging while the car is running. A faulty alternator can be diagnosed by checking the battery voltage while the car runs.

#4 Check for corroded connections on the battery terminals

Corrosion can prevent the battery from receiving a charge. Clean the terminals with baking soda, water, or a specialized stiff bristle brush.

#5 Inspect for a dirty or loose connection

Check for a dirty battery connection. Ensure the battery cables are properly connected and the terminals are clean. Some Tesla models use a voltage regulator that can malfunction and cause the battery to overheat, so it’s important to inspect this particular voltage regulator as well.

#6. Look for issues with the charging system

A malfunctioning electrical system can prevent the battery from receiving a charge. The alternator belt can also cause problems, so it is important to inspect this for any signs of wear and tear.

#7. Do you have good battery health with enough power flow?

You can use a multimeter to check the battery’s voltage and state of charge. Dead batteries typically have a voltage of fewer than 12.5 volts and will not accept a charge.

Verify that the multimeter does not have a blown fuse before you use it. Also, leaving the engine running and the battery connected while you are troubleshooting can result in a false reading of the battery’s voltage.

#8. Check for a non-compliant battery for the specific vehicle

Using a battery not designed for the vehicle can cause the battery to die faster. Your automobile may require more power to start up than what the current battery can supply.

If these steps do not reveal the problem, it may be best to consult a professional mechanic to diagnose the issue.

Why Does My Car Battery Keeps Dying While I Am Driving?

If your car battery keeps dying while you are driving, there could be several potential causes:

  1. Overcharging: If the charging system is not functioning properly, it may cause the battery to overcharge, which can cause the battery to die.
  2. Alternator output failure: The alternator is responsible for charging the battery while the car runs. If you have a bad alternator, it may not be able to charge the battery correctly, causing it to die while driving.
  3. Loose or corroded battery terminals: If the terminals are loose or corroded, this can prevent the battery from receiving a charge and cause it to die while driving.
  4. Electrical drain: If there is an electrical issue, such as a short circuit or a parasitic draw from a faulty component, this can cause it to drain while the car is running.
  5. Cold weather: Cold weather can reduce the battery’s ability to hold a charge and cause it to die while driving.

It is recommended to have your car checked by an experienced mechanic with specialized tools to diagnose the car’s electrical system. They can use a multimeter with a test light to determine the cause of the problem and recommend the appropriate repair.

How Can You Avoid Your Car Battery from Dying Again?

Mechanic can test for a parasitic draw using a multimeter for this purpose

Here are some ways you can prevent your battery from dying:

Have your charging system and alternator checked – If the charging system or alternator isn’t working properly, it can prevent the battery from recharging, leading to a dead battery.

Use a battery that is designed for your auto and the climate you are in – Using a battery that is not designed for the vehicle or region can cause the battery to die faster.

Drive your car regularly – If you’re not using it for a while, disconnect the battery or use a battery maintainer to keep it charged.

Keep the battery properly maintained – Check its water level and make sure it is properly charged. You can use a multimeter to check the battery’s voltage and state of charge.

Turn off lights and electrical devices – Ensure all interior lights, dome lights, and other specific components are turned off when the car is not in use to prevent an electrical drain on the battery. Sometimes the glove box light will stay on, so it is important to check if that is the case and turn it off.

Keep your car in a cool place – Exposure to extreme heat can shorten the life of your battery. Park in a shaded area or use sunshades to keep the vehicle cool.

Avoid short trips – If you only take short trips, the battery may not receive enough charge to maintain its power. Try to take longer trips or drive the vehicle for at least 20 minutes weekly.

Keep your battery clean and tight – Clean the terminals with baking soda and water or with a specialized terminal cleaner, and make sure the battery is securely fastened to the vehicle.

By following these tips, you can help extend the life of your new battery and prevent it from dying unexpectedly.

FAQs

Looking for more answers to your battery questions? Well, here it is!

Q: How long should my car sit before the battery completely drains?

The length of time a vehicle can sit before the battery drains depends on several factors, including the age and condition of the battery, the temperature, and the draw from the car’s electrical systems.

Typically, a new battery should be able to sit for at least a month without dying. However, if the battery is older, has a low charge, or is exposed to extreme temperatures, it may die sooner.

A parasitic drain can also drain the battery, such as a faulty component or aftermarket device. Sometimes, a can have a drained battery within a few days or even a few hours if there is a significant parasitic drain or the battery is faulty.

Q: Does GPS or Bluetooth cause the car battery to die randomly?

While GPS and Bluetooth devices may contribute to battery drain, they are not typically the sole cause of a car battery dying unexpectedly.

GPS and Bluetooth devices use a small amount of power but do not typically draw sufficient power to drain a car battery. However, if the battery is weak or has a parasitic drain from another source, the added power drawn from a GPS or Bluetooth device may cause the battery to die.

Q: What are the telltale signs that I have a weak or dead battery?

Here are some warning signs that batteries may be weak or failing:

Slow engine crank: It takes longer than normal for the engine to turn over when starting the vehicle.

Warning lights on the dashboard: Some cars will have a warning light that indicates a weak or failing issues with batteries. A weak battery can also cause the check engine light to come on.

Strange noises: When starting the car, a whining or grinding noise may indicate a failing battery or bad alternator.

Car not starting: If the vehicle doesn’t start at all, it could be a sign of a dead battery.

Swelling or leaks: When batteries are swelling or leaking, they must be replaced immediately.

Reduced performance: A weak battery can cause the vehicle to have reduced performance, such as stalling or poor idling.

Final Thoughts

People prefer to install a good battery instead of having to get their old one fully recharged. A bad serpentine belt can draw too much power or electricity from the battery, which can cause it to run down even when it has been recently charged.

Always remember that you don’t check the alternator while the engine runs. This post addressed your concerns when your battery keeps dying but alternator is good. We hope this helps you.

Last Updated on: February 1, 2023

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